Are You Prepared for Easter?

Posted: 17th April 2019

With Easter just around the corner it’s time to inform you of all the possible toxins your pets could encounter over this chocolate filled period. There are many things that can be dangerous to cats and dogs and here is why:

Chocolate: The chocolatey goodness looks very appetising to the canine eye, and unfortunately it isn’t unheard of, of these animals getting their paws into some. Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine, which is highly toxic to dogs. Dark, unsweetened chocolate contains higher levels of theobromine, which mean it’s more dangerous. Clinical signs that your pet has ingested chocolate include hyperactivity, diarrhoea, vomiting, elevated or abnormal heart rates, and potentially seizures.

Lilies: It is not known exactly what the toxin is in lilies, but it damages the cells in the kidneys and causes kidney failure in our feline friends. If your cat is exposed to any part of a lily, they may begin showing signs of vomiting, drooling, weakness and depression, within 1-6 hours of exposure. Without any treatment, the cat will become dehydrated, stop eating, be in pain and may even have seizures. Death usually occurs 2-3 days after lily exposure without treatment, so this is why it is really important to keep these toxic flowers far away from your cats, ideally out of the house all together.

Grapes, raisins, currants and sultanas: Our Easter favourite hot cross buns contains a lot of these ingredients, and these can be poisonous to dogs, and potentially poisonous to cats. It is thought that the dried version of the fruits is more likely to cause severe symptoms and potentially kidney failure, but it is not clear what it is about these dried fruits what makes them so toxic for our pets. Clinical signs include vomiting and diarrhoea, abnormal drinking and urination, lots of drooling, lack of appetite, weakness/wobbly when walking, lethargy and blood in urine.

If you are at all suspicious your pet has ingested something they shouldn’t off, please seek advice and treatment as soon as possible, it is best they receive treatment early for the best prognosis, do not wait for clinical signs to appear. If you have any concerns over the Easter period, you can call the ‘Animal Poisonline’ t: 01202 509000 for a fee of £30, based on your pet’s weight, and the amount of toxin they have consumed, they will be able to advise you whether you need to get your pet seen by a Veterinary Surgeon.

Are You Prepared for Easter?